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About feeding children: factor structure and internal reliability of a survey to assess mealtime strategies and beliefs of early childhood education teachers

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
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Title
About feeding children: factor structure and internal reliability of a survey to assess mealtime strategies and beliefs of early childhood education teachers
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0717-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taren Swindle, Madeleine Sigman-Grant, Laurel J. Branen, Janice Fletcher, Susan L. Johnson

Abstract

Children spend a substantial amount of time in early care and education (ECE) settings and may eat a majority of their diet in this setting. While there are several instruments focused on measuring factors of the ECE environment that may influence diet and weight outcomes, there are few comprehensive, valid, and reliable measures for collecting self-report of ECE providers' feeding practices. The purpose of this study was to establish the factor structure and internal reliability of a survey developed to measure practices and beliefs of ECE providers relative to feeding children. Licensed ECE centers from CA, CO, ID and NV were included in this cross-sectional survey study. The sample was stratified by states and census regions to yield equal numbers of centers from each category. The total sample distribution included 1600 randomly selected centers and up to 8000 staff members (who represented teachers, aides, assistants, or cooks); 1178 surveys were completed. We conducted an exploratory, unrestricted factor analysis as well as parallel analyses to inform the number of factors to be extracted. Factors within Structural Mealtime Strategies included Adult Control of Foods Consumed (Kuder-Richardson [KR] = 0.67), Bribing with Sweet Foods (KR = 0.70), and Supportive Adult Roles at Mealtime (KR = 0.55). Factors in Verbal Mealtime Strategies included Supporting Children's Eating Self-regulation (KR =0.61), Pressure to Eat (KR = 0.58), and Social Comparisons (KR = 0.59). Beliefs about Mealtime factors were Autonomy Promoting (α = 0.64), Coercive Beliefs (α = 0.77), and Concern-Based Control (α = 0.60). The AFC Strategies and Beliefs Survey provides a promising self-report instrument with a strong factor structure consistent with the extant literature to measure practices and beliefs related to feeding and mealtimes in the ECE setting. Feeding young children in group settings differs in many ways from feeding in a family setting; hence it is important that measures such as the AFC Strategies and Beliefs Survey capture unique aspects of the ECE feeding environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Master 12 13%
Researcher 11 11%
Other 7 7%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 27 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 20 21%
Psychology 11 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 11%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Sports and Recreations 4 4%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 36 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2020.
All research outputs
#5,221,186
of 19,814,211 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,321
of 1,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,271
of 291,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,814,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,779 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.8. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,394 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them