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Usage of the HINTS exam and neuroimaging in the assessment of peripheral vertigo in the emergency department

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, September 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Usage of the HINTS exam and neuroimaging in the assessment of peripheral vertigo in the emergency department
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40463-018-0305-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandra E. Quimby, Edmund S. H. Kwok, Daniel Lelli, Peter Johns, Darren Tse

Abstract

Dizziness is a common presenting symptom in the emergency department (ED). The HINTS exam, a battery of bedside clinical tests, has been shown to have greater sensitivity than neuroimaging in ruling out stroke in patients presenting with acute vertigo. The present study sought to assess practice patterns in the assessment of patients in the ED with peripherally-originating vertigo with respect to utilization of HINTS and neuroimaging. A retrospective cohort study was performed using data pertaining to 500 randomly selected ED visits at a tertiary care centre with a final diagnostic code related to peripherally-originating vertigo between January 1, 2010 - December 31, 2014. A total of 380 patients met inclusion criteria. Of patients presenting to the ED with dizziness and vertigo and a final diagnosis of non-central vertigo, 139 (36.6%) received neuroimaging in the form of CT, CT angiography, or MRI. Of patients who did not undergo neuroimaging, 17 (7.1%) had a bedside HINTS exam performed. Almost half (44%) of documented HINTS interpretations consisted of the ambiguous usage of "HINTS negative" as opposed to the terminology suggested in the literature ("HINTS central" or "HINTS peripheral"). In this single-centre retrospective review, we have demonstrated that the HINTS exam is under-utilized in the ED as compared to neuroimaging in the assessment of patients with peripheral vertigo. This finding suggests that there is room for improvement in ED physicians' application and interpretation of the HINTS exam.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 23%
Student > Postgraduate 10 12%
Student > Master 8 10%
Other 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 22 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 12%
Unspecified 2 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 28 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2020.
All research outputs
#5,018,680
of 19,225,771 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#52
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,148
of 288,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,225,771 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,148 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them