↓ Skip to main content

Experimental evolution of recombination and crossover interference in Drosophila caused by directional selection for stress-related traits

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Experimental evolution of recombination and crossover interference in Drosophila caused by directional selection for stress-related traits
Published in
BMC Biology, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12915-015-0206-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dau Dayal Aggarwal, Eugenia Rashkovetsky, Pawel Michalak, Irit Cohen, Yefim Ronin, Dan Zhou, Gabriel G. Haddad, Abraham B. Korol

Abstract

Population genetics predicts that tight linkage between new and/or pre-existing beneficial and deleterious alleles should decrease the efficiency of natural selection in finite populations. By decoupling beneficial and deleterious alleles and facilitating the combination of beneficial alleles, recombination accelerates the formation of high-fitness genotypes. This may impose indirect selection for increased recombination. Despite the progress in theoretical understanding, interplay between recombination and selection remains a controversial issue in evolutionary biology. Even less satisfactory is the situation with crossover interference, which is a deviation of double-crossover frequency in a pair of adjacent intervals from the product of recombination rates in the two intervals expected on the assumption of crossover independence. Here, we report substantial changes in recombination and interference in three long-term directional selection experiments with Drosophila melanogaster: for desiccation (~50 generations), hypoxia, and hyperoxia tolerance (>200 generations each). For all three experiments, we found a high interval-specific increase of recombination frequencies in selection lines (up to 40-50 % per interval) compared to the control lines. We also discovered a profound effect of selection on interference as expressed by an increased frequency of double crossovers in selection lines. Our results show that changes in interference are not necessarily coupled with increased recombination. Our results support the theoretical predictions that adaptation to a new environment can promote evolution toward higher recombination. Moreover, this is the first evidence of selection for different recombination-unrelated traits potentially leading, not only to evolution toward increased crossover rates, but also to changes in crossover interference, one of the fundamental features of recombination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 58 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 25%
Researcher 13 22%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Mathematics 2 3%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2016.
All research outputs
#7,020,445
of 11,293,566 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#857
of 1,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,641
of 309,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#32
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,293,566 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,017 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.