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Pregnant women’s navigation of information on everyday household chemicals: phthalates as a case study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Pregnant women’s navigation of information on everyday household chemicals: phthalates as a case study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0748-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justin M. Ashley, Alexandra Hodgson, Sapna Sharma, Jeff Nisker

Abstract

Current developments in science and the media have now placed pregnant women in a precarious situation as they are charged with the responsibility to navigate through information sources to make the best decisions for her pregnancy. Yet little is known regarding how pregnant women want to receive and use health information in general, let alone information regarding the uncertain risks to pregnancy in everyday household products such as phthalates found in cosmetics and canned food liners. Using phthalates as an example, this study investigated how pregnant women obtain, evaluate, and act on information regarding their pregnancy. Pregnant women were recruited using pamphlets and posters distributed in prenatal clinics, prenatal fairs and physician offices in Southwestern Ontario Canada. Research participants were engaged in 20 to 40 min semi-structured interviews regarding their use of information sources in pregnancy, particularly regarding phthalates in cosmetics and canned food liners. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using constructivist grounded theory techniques supported by NVivo 9™ software. Theoretical sufficiency was reached after 23 pregnant women were interviewed and their transcripts analyzed. Three overlapping themes resulted from the co-constructed analysis: I-Strength of Information Sources; II-Value Modifiers; and III-Deciding to Control Exposure. The research participants reported receiving information from a wide range of sources that they perceived varying in strength or believability. They then described the strategies employed to increase the validity of the message in order to avoid risk exposure. Pregnant women preferred a strong source of information such as physician, government but frequently used weak sources such as the internet or the opinions of friends. A model was developed from the relationship between themes that describes how pregnant women navigate the multiple sources of information available to them. Our study provides insight into how pregnant women receive, appraise, and act on information regarding everyday household chemicals. Clinicians and their professional organizations should produce specific educational materials to assist women in understanding exposure to everyday products in pregnancy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Psychology 5 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 9%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2019.
All research outputs
#1,614,197
of 16,470,846 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#448
of 3,046 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,102
of 370,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#41
of 304 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,470,846 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,046 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 370,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 304 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.