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Environmental footprints of food consumption and dietary patterns among Lebanese adults: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, September 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Environmental footprints of food consumption and dietary patterns among Lebanese adults: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Nutrition Journal, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12937-018-0393-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farah Naja, Lamis Jomaa, Leila Itani, Jeremy Zidek, Sibelle El Labban, Abla Mehio Sibai, Nahla Hwalla

Abstract

Following the release of the Sustainable Development Goals, dietary patterns and guidelines are being revised for their effect on the environment in addition to their health implications. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the Environmental Footprints (EFPs) of food consumption patterns among Lebanese adults. For this study, data for adults aged > 18 years (n = 337) were drawn from a previous national survey conducted in Lebanon (2008-2009), where dietary intake was assessed using a 61-item Food Frequency Questionnaire. Dietary patterns previously derived in the study sample included: Western, Lebanese-Mediterranean and High-Protein. In this study, food consumption and dietary patterns were examined for their EFPs including water use, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, using review of life cycle analyses. In the study population, the EFPs of food consumption were: water use: 2571.62 ± 1259.45 L/day; energy use: 37.34 ± 19.98 MJ/day and GHGs: 4.06 ± 1.93 kg CO2 eq / day. Among the three dietary patterns prevalent in the study population, the Lebanese-Mediterranean diet had the lowest water use and GHG per 1000 Kcal (Water (L/Kg): 443.61 ± 197.15, 243.35 ± 112.0, 264.72 ± 161.67; GHG (KG CO2 eq/day) 0.58 ± 0.32, 0.38 ± 0.24, 0.57 ± 0.37, for the Western, Lebanese-Mediterranean and High- Protein, respectively). The scores of the High-Protein dietary pattern were associated with higher odds of the three EFPs, whereas the Lebanese-Mediterranean dietary pattern was associated with lower odds of energy use. Furthermore, scores of the Western pattern were associated with higher water use. The findings of this study showed that, among Lebanese adults, the Western and High-Protein dietary patterns had high EFPs, whereas the Lebanese-Mediterranean dietary pattern had lower water use and GHG emissions. Coupled to our earlier findings of the Lebanese-Mediterranean pattern's beneficial effects on health, the findings of this study lend evidence for the notion that what is healthy for people may also be healthy for ecosystems and highlight the need for nutrition recommendations to take into consideration the nexus of water, food, energy, in addition to health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Professor 5 6%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 26 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 8 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 5%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 20 24%
Unknown 36 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,300,265
of 13,520,735 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#776
of 1,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,532
of 264,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,520,735 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.1. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them