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Mobilising the alumni of a Master of Public Health degree to build research and development capacity in low- and middle-income settings: The Peoples-uni

Overview of attention for article published in Health Research Policy and Systems, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Mobilising the alumni of a Master of Public Health degree to build research and development capacity in low- and middle-income settings: The Peoples-uni
Published in
Health Research Policy and Systems, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12961-015-0064-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard F Heller, Pasipanodya I Machingura, Baba M Musa, Paramita Sengupta, Puja Myles

Abstract

Peoples-uni (People's Open Access Education Initiative) was established to help build Public Health capacity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through postgraduate level online courses. Graduates are invited to join a virtual alumni group. We report the results of efforts to meet the need for health research capacity building by exploring how the course alumni could be mobilised to perform collaborative research into the health problems of their populations. Two online surveys of Peoples-uni graduates were conducted with graduates from the first two and first four cohorts in 2013 and 2014, respectively, to explore the formation of an alumni group that would collaborate to further the research and development agenda in LMICs. This was followed by feedback on research-related activity and outcomes via the online alumni and tutors' forum to estimate early indicators of alumni success in relation to capacity building in both the conduct and utilisation of research. Responses were received from 26 (87% response rate) graduates of the first survey and 42 (60% response rate) of the second survey. Overall, 92% of the respondents to the first survey supported the creation of an alumni group, especially if it helped to develop their own research skills and improve the health of their populations. Findings from the second survey showed that study with Peoples-uni was felt to have had a major or potential impact on the careers of the respondents, with 19% of graduates having progressed to a PhD programme to further their research skills, and a further 48% being in the process of applying or intending to apply for doctoral studies. Further feedback shows that at least one collaborative study has been completed and published by alumni members with other collaborative studies planned. Ongoing support has been provided to graduates to help them publish their work and apply for individual or collaborative research grants. Harnessing the alumni of a Masters level course to perform collaborative research has considerable potential to build research capacity in LMICs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Rwanda 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Researcher 8 14%
Professor 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 27%
Social Sciences 10 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,500,377
of 7,465,518 outputs
Outputs from Health Research Policy and Systems
#213
of 420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,843
of 288,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Research Policy and Systems
#15
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,465,518 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 420 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,496 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.