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Longitudinal associations of in utero and early life near-roadway air pollution with trajectories of childhood body mass index

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, September 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

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Title
Longitudinal associations of in utero and early life near-roadway air pollution with trajectories of childhood body mass index
Published in
Environmental Health, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12940-018-0409-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeniffer S. Kim, Tanya L. Alderete, Zhanghua Chen, Fred Lurmann, Ed Rappaport, Rima Habre, Kiros Berhane, Frank D. Gilliland

Abstract

Evidence suggests that childhood near-roadway air pollution (NRAP) exposures contribute to increased body mass index (BMI); however, effects of NRAP exposure during the vulnerable periods including in utero and first year of life have yet to be established. In this study, we examined whether exposure to elevated concentrations of NRAP during in utero and/or first year of life increase childhood BMI growth. Participants in the Children's Health Study enrolled from 2002 to 2003 with annual visits over a four-year period and who changed residences before study entry were included (n = 2318). Annual height and weight were measured and lifetime residential NRAP exposures including in utero and first year of life periods were estimated by nitrogen oxides (NOx) using the California line-source dispersion model. Linear mixed effects models assessed in utero or first year near-road freeway and non-freeway NOx exposures and BMI growth after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, parental education, Spanish questionnaire, and later childhood near-road NOx exposure. A two-standard deviation difference in first year of life near-road freeway NOx exposure was associated with a 0.1 kg/m2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03, 0.2) faster increase in BMI growth per year and a 0.5 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.9) higher attained BMI at age 10 years. Higher exposure to early life NRAP increased the rate of change of childhood BMI and resulted in a higher attained BMI at age 10 years that were independent of later childhood exposures. These findings suggest that elevated early life NRAP exposures contribute to increased obesity risk in children.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Student > Master 11 16%
Other 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 4%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Environmental Science 9 13%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 26 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 141. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2019.
All research outputs
#223,076
of 21,683,768 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#68
of 1,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,335
of 295,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,683,768 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,754 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
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