↓ Skip to main content

Nutrient Administration and Resistance Training

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, June 2005
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Nutrient Administration and Resistance Training
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, June 2005
DOI 10.1186/1550-2783-2-1-50
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chad M Kerksick, Brian Leutholtz

Abstract

Skeletal muscle tissue is tightly regulated throughout our bodies by balancing its synthesis and breakdown. Many factors are known to exist that cause profound changes on the overall status of skeletal muscle, some of which include exercise, nutrition, hormonal influences and disease. Muscle hypertrophy results when protein synthesis is greater than protein breakdown. Resistance training is a popular form of exercise that has been shown to increase muscular strength and muscular hypertrophy. In general, resistance training causes a stimulation of protein synthesis as well as an increase in protein breakdown, resulting in a negative balance of protein. Providing nutrients, specifically amino acids, helps to stimulate protein synthesis and improve the overall net balance of protein. Strategies to increase the concentration and availability of amino acids after resistance exercise are of great interest and have been shown to effectively increase overall protein synthesis. 123 After exercise, providing carbohydrate has been shown to mildly stimulate protein synthesis while addition of free amino acids prior to and after exercise, specifically essential amino acids, causes a rapid pronounced increase in protein synthesis as well as protein balance.13 Evidence exists for a dose-response relationship of infused amino acids while no specific regimen exists for optimal dosing upon ingestion. Ingestion of whole or intact protein sources (e.g., protein powders, meal-replacements) has been shown to cause similar improvements in protein balance after resistance exercise when compared to free amino acid supplements. Future research should seek to determine optimal dosing of ingested intact amino acids in addition to identifying the cellular mechanistic machinery (e.g. transcriptional and translational mechanisms) for causing the increase in protein synthesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Ukraine 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 93 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 21%
Student > Bachelor 19 20%
Researcher 8 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 6%
Other 24 25%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 30 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 10%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 12 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2017.
All research outputs
#4,087,460
of 16,520,485 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#529
of 768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,713
of 218,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#32
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,520,485 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 768 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.8. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.