↓ Skip to main content

Opioid analgesics increase incidence of somnolence and dizziness as adverse effects of pregabalin: a retrospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Opioid analgesics increase incidence of somnolence and dizziness as adverse effects of pregabalin: a retrospective study
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40780-015-0032-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Akihiro Ohishi, Yugo Chisaki, Daiki Hira, Kazuki Nagasawa, Tomohiro Terada

Abstract

Pregabalin, a gabapentinoid, is an adjuvant analgesic for treatment of neuropathic pain, but it has serious adverse effects such as somnolence and dizziness, particularly in elderly patients. Although decreased renal function is considered to the contributing factor for high frequency of these adverse effects in elder patients, only a few systematic clinical investigations, especially for hospitalized patients, have been performed on factors that might affect the incidence of its adverse effects. In this study, we performed a retrospective study on the effect of concomitant drugs on induction of somnolence and dizziness as adverse effects of pregabalin in hospitalized patients. The subjects were all pregabalin-administered patients in Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital from September 2010 to September 2012, and the subject number was 195. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of the adverse effects, creatinine clearance, duration of pregabalin therapy, initial and maintenance doses of pregabalin, and concomitant drugs, including hypoglycemic drugs, anti-hypertensive ones, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ones, opioids and central nervous system depressants, being used as independent variables. The median initial doses of pregabalin in each renal function group were the same with the case of the defined dose. Although renal function is a well-known factor for prediction of development of adverse effects of pregabalin, we did not detect significant contribution of it. Alternatively, it was demonstrated that concomitant administration of opioids was the significant factor of the incidence of somnolence and dizziness. The first onset date of the adverse effects was frequently detected in the early days of the pregabalin therapy. The fine tuning of pregabalin dosage schedule based on the renal function appeared to be critical for prevention of development of its adverse effects. Adverse effects tended to develop in the initial phase of pregabalin therapy. Concomitant administration of opioids with pregabalin has the potential to increase the incidence of adverse effects, and thus much more careful attention has to be paid especially in those situations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Master 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 5 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Chemistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2015.
All research outputs
#4,913,206
of 6,640,754 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences
#15
of 29 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,658
of 253,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,640,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one scored the same or higher as 14 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,670 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.