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Genomic insights into host adaptation between the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) and the barley stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, September 2018
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Genomic insights into host adaptation between the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) and the barley stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei)
Published in
BMC Genomics, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-5041-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chongjing Xia, Meinan Wang, Chuntao Yin, Omar E. Cornejo, Scot H. Hulbert, Xianming Chen

Abstract

Plant fungal pathogens can rapidly evolve and adapt to new environmental conditions in response to sudden changes of host populations in agro-ecosystems. However, the genomic basis of their host adaptation, especially at the forma specialis level, remains unclear. We sequenced two isolates each representing Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) and P. striiformis f. sp. hordei (Psh), different formae speciales of the stripe rust fungus P. striiformis highly adapted to wheat and barley, respectively. The divergence of Pst and Psh, estimated to start 8.12 million years ago, has been driven by high nucleotide mutation rates. The high genomic variation within dikaryotic urediniospores of P. striiformis has provided raw genetic materials for genome evolution. No specific gene families have enriched in either isolate, but extensive gene loss events have occurred in both Pst and Psh after the divergence from their most recent common ancestor. A large number of isolate-specific genes were identified, with unique genomic features compared to the conserved genes, including 1) significantly shorter in length; 2) significantly less expressed; 3) significantly closer to transposable elements; and 4) redundant in pathways. The presence of specific genes in one isolate (or forma specialis) was resulted from the loss of the homologues in the other isolate (or forma specialis) by the replacements of transposable elements or losses of genomic fragments. In addition, different patterns and numbers of telomeric repeats were observed between the isolates. Host adaptation of P. striiformis at the forma specialis level is a complex pathogenic trait, involving not only virulence-related genes but also other genes. Gene loss, which might be adaptive and driven by transposable element activities, provides genomic basis for host adaptation of different formae speciales of P. striiformis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 26%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 14 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2019.
All research outputs
#3,620,280
of 14,437,320 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,842
of 8,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,811
of 271,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,437,320 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,420 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,274 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.