↓ Skip to main content

Transfection with thymidine kinase permits bromodeoxyuridine labelling of DNA replication in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Transfection with thymidine kinase permits bromodeoxyuridine labelling of DNA replication in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
Published in
Malaria Journal, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-1014-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine J. Merrick

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, is an early-diverging protozoan whose lifecycle has many unusual features, including its modes of replication. Research on the Plasmodium cell cycle, which occurs primarily via schizogony instead of canonical binary fission, has been hampered by a lack of tools and markers that can be transferred from cell cycle studies in model organisms. A common tool used to study DNA replication and the cell cycle in human cells is the labelling of newly-replicated DNA with the modified nucleotide bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), followed by immunofluorescent detection. Plasmodium parasites, however, do not incorporate BrdU because they rely only on de novo synthesis of pyrimidines and do not salvage thymidine analogues like BrdU for conversion into nucleotides. Analysis of biochemical pathways in Plasmodium indicated that the absence of the enzyme thymidine kinase (TK) may be the only impediment to BrdU incorporation in this organism. A TK gene from Herpes simplex was, therefore, introduced into the Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain and the effect on BrdU labelling was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Introduction of a TK gene produces parasites that can indeed incorporate BrdU. This forms a sensitive indicator of DNA replication, which can be detected by both quantitative and qualitative assays on either a population level or a single-cell level. Plasmodium falciparum, when expressing TK, becomes unusually sensitive to BrdU toxicity. BrdU labelling represents a significant new tool for investigating DNA replication and the cell cycle in Plasmodium.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Master 8 22%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 28%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Computer Science 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2017.
All research outputs
#2,020,428
of 9,424,035 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#757
of 3,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,812
of 308,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#34
of 165 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,424,035 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,229 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 165 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.