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Incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma by socioeconomic status in Canada: 1992–2006

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, December 2015
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  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 192)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma by socioeconomic status in Canada: 1992–2006
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0107-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie E. Johnson-Obaseki, Varant Labajian, Martin J. Corsten, James T. McDonald

Abstract

There are no nationwide studies documenting changes in cutaneous malignant melanoma incidence or association of incidence with socioeconomic status (SES) in Canada. We sought to determine whether melanoma incidence increased from 1992 to 2006 and if there was an association between SES and melanoma incidence. Additionally, we studied whether there was a correlation between province of residence and melanoma incidence. Cases from the Canadian Cancer Registry were reviewed. Demographic and socioeconomic information were extracted from the Canadian Census of Population data. Cases were linked to income quintiles by postal code. A negative binomial regression was performed to identify relationships among these variables. Overall incidence of melanoma in Canada increased by 67 % from 1992 to 2006 (p < 0.0001). The increase in incidence was greater for melanoma in situ compared with invasive melanoma (136 % versus 52 % [p < 0.0001]). Incidence was positively correlated with higher income quintiles; the incidence rates among patients in the lowest income quintiles were 67 % of that for the highest income quintiles (p < 0.0001). A wide variety of explanations have been postulated for an increased incidence in melanoma among persons of higher SES, including access to and awareness of screening, more access to vacations in sunny climates, and increased leisure time. Variations in incidence of melanoma by urban vs. rural location and province may indicate differences in access to dermatologists across Canada. Melanoma incidence is increasing in Canada and is higher among people in high SES groups. This rise is likely due to a combination of factors including a true rise in incidence due to increases in sun exposure, and also an increased detection rate, particularly in those who are more aware of the disease and have access to resources for detection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 22%
Student > Master 6 17%
Other 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Physics and Astronomy 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 12 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,133,504
of 7,719,347 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#23
of 192 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,621
of 293,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#2
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,719,347 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 192 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,012 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.