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Long-term effects of a 12 weeks high-intensity functional exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia: a single blinded randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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254 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term effects of a 12 weeks high-intensity functional exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia: a single blinded randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0151-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabeth Wiken Telenius, Knut Engedal, Astrid Bergland

Abstract

Research indicates that exercise can have a positive effect on both physical and mental health in nursing home patients with dementia, however the lasting effect is rarely studied. In a previously published article we investigated the immediate effect of a 12 weeks functional exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia. In this paper we studied the long-term effect of this exercise program. We explored the differences between the exercise and control group from baseline to 6 months follow-up and during the detraining period from month 3 to 6. A single blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted and a total of 170 nursing home residents with dementia were included. The participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 87) or a control group (n = 83). The intervention consisted of intensive strengthening and balance exercises in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. The control condition was leisure activities. Thirty participants were lost between baseline and six-month follow-up. Linear mixed model analyses for repeated measurements were used to investigate the effect of exercise after detraining period. The exercise group improved their scores on Berg Balance Scale from baseline to 6 months follow-up by 2.7 points in average. The control group deteriorated in the same period and the difference between groups was statistically significant (p = 0.031). The exercise group also scored better on NPI agitation sub-score after 6 months (p = 0.045). The results demonstrate long-time positive effects of a high intensity functional exercise program on balance and indicate a positive effect on agitation, after an intervention period of 12 weeks followed by a detraining period of 12 weeks. Identifier at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02262104.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 254 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 250 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 18%
Student > Bachelor 36 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 11%
Student > Postgraduate 18 7%
Researcher 18 7%
Other 43 17%
Unknown 65 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 58 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 17%
Sports and Recreations 24 9%
Psychology 12 5%
Neuroscience 9 4%
Other 34 13%
Unknown 74 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2017.
All research outputs
#1,538,871
of 16,585,337 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#353
of 1,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,910
of 370,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#26
of 137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,585,337 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 370,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.