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Mitochondrial pathology in progressive cerebellar ataxia

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebellum & Ataxias, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Mitochondrial pathology in progressive cerebellar ataxia
Published in
Cerebellum & Ataxias, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40673-015-0035-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Bargiela, Priya Shanmugarajah, Christine Lo, Emma L. Blakely, Robert W. Taylor, Rita Horvath, Stephen Wharton, Patrick F. Chinnery, Marios Hadjivassiliou

Abstract

Mitochondrial disease can manifest as multi-organ disorder, often with neurological dysfunction. Cerebellar ataxia in isolation or in combination with other features can result from mitochondrial disease yet genetic testing using blood DNA is not sufficient to exclude this as a cause of ataxia. Muscle biopsy is a useful diagnostic tool for patients with ataxia suspected of mitochondrial disease. Our aim was to determine specific patient selection criteria for muscle biopsy to see how frequent mitochondrial mutations are responsible for progressive ataxia. We performed a two centre retrospective review of patients with unexplained progressive ataxia who underwent muscle biopsy for suspected mitochondrial disease between 2004 and 2014 (Sheffield and Newcastle Ataxia Centres). A total of 126 patients were identified; 26 assessed in Newcastle and 100 in Sheffield. Twenty-four patients had pure ataxia and 102 had ataxia with additional features. The total number of patients with histologically suspected and/or genetically confirmed mitochondrial disease was 29/126 (23 %). A large proportion of patients (23 %) with progressive ataxia who underwent muscle biopsy were found to have features of mitochondrial dysfunction, with molecular confirmation in some. Muscle biopsy is a helpful diagnostic tool for mitochondrial disease in patients with progressive ataxia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 27%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,687,666
of 6,920,439 outputs
Outputs from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#12
of 40 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,881
of 283,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,920,439 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 40 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one scored the same or higher as 28 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.