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Skeletal muscle-derived cell implantation for the treatment of sphincter-related faecal incontinence

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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2 patents

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Skeletal muscle-derived cell implantation for the treatment of sphincter-related faecal incontinence
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0978-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea Frudinger, Rainer Marksteiner, Johann Pfeifer, Eva Margreiter, Johannes Paede, Marco Thurner

Abstract

In an earlier pilot study with 10 women, we investigated a new approach for therapy of faecal incontinence (FI) due to obstetric trauma, involving ultrasound-guided injection of autologous skeletal muscle-derived cells (SMDC) into the external anal sphincter (EAS), and observed significant improvement. In the current study, we tested this therapeutic approach in an extended patient group: male and female patients suffering from FI due to EAS damage and/or atrophy. Furthermore, feasibility of lower cell counts and cryo-preserved SMDC was assessed. In this single-centre, explorative, baseline-controlled clinical trial, each patient (n = 39; mean age 60.6 ± 13.81 years) received 79.4 ± 22.5 × 106 cryo-preserved autologous SMDC. Changes in FI parameters, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL), anorectal manometry and safety from baseline to 1, 6 and 12 months post implantation were evaluated. SMDC used in this trial contained a high percentage of myogenic-expressing (CD56+) and muscle stem cell marker-expressing (Pax7+, Myf5+) cells. Intervention was well tolerated without any serious adverse events. After 12 months, the number of weekly incontinence episodes (WIE, primary variable), FIQL and patient condition had improved significantly. In 80.6% of males and 78.4% of females, the WIE frequency decreased by at least 50%; Wexner scores and severity of FI complaints decreased significantly, independent of gender and cause of FI. Injection of SMDCs into the EAS effectively improved sphincter-related FI due to EAS damage and/or atrophy in males and females. When confirmed in a larger, placebo-controlled trial, this minimal invasive procedure has the potential to become first-line therapy for FI. EU Clinical Trials Register, EudraCT 2010-023826-19 (Date of registration: 08.11.2010).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 16 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Engineering 3 7%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 17 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2021.
All research outputs
#5,965,228
of 21,385,220 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#552
of 2,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,251
of 294,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,385,220 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,216 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,877 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them