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Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to exogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) by modifying phospholipid composition, membrane permeability, and phenotypes associated with virulence

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, September 2018
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Title
Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to exogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) by modifying phospholipid composition, membrane permeability, and phenotypes associated with virulence
Published in
BMC Microbiology, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12866-018-1259-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lyssa Y. Baker, Chelsea R. Hobby, Andrew W. Siv, William C. Bible, Michael S. Glennon, Derek M. Anderson, Steven J. Symes, David K. Giles

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common opportunistic pathogen, is known to cause infections in a variety of compromised human tissues. An emerging mechanism for microbial survival is the incorporation of exogenous fatty acids to alter the cell's membrane phospholipid profile. With these findings, we show that exogenous fatty acid exposure leads to changes in bacterial membrane phospholipid structure, membrane permeability, virulence phenotypes and consequent stress responses that may influence survival and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thin-layer chromatography and ultra performance liquid chromatography / ESI-mass spectrometry indicated alteration of bacterial phospholipid profiles following growth in the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (ranging in carbon length and unsaturation). The exogenously supplied fatty acids were incorporated into the major bacterial phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The incorporation of fatty acids increased membrane permeability as judged by both accumulation and exclusion of ethidium bromide. Individual fatty acids were identified as modifying resistance to the cyclic peptide antibiotics polymyxin B and colistin, but not the beta-lactam imipenem. Biofilm formation was increased by several PUFAs and significant fluctuations in swimming motility were observed. Our results emphasize the relevance and complexity of exogenous fatty acids in the membrane physiology and pathobiology of a medically important pathogen. P. aeruginosa exhibits versatility with regard to utilization of and response to exogenous fatty acids, perhaps revealing potential strategies for prevention and control of infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 4 7%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 13%
Chemistry 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,313,702
of 13,520,735 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,250
of 2,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,751
of 263,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
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