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A novel consortium of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Streptococcus thermophilus for increased access to functional fermented foods

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Cell Factories, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 1,366)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
138 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
A novel consortium of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Streptococcus thermophilus for increased access to functional fermented foods
Published in
Microbial Cell Factories, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12934-015-0370-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Remco Kort, Nieke Westerik, L. Mariela Serrano, François P. Douillard, Willi Gottstein, Ivan M. Mukisa, Coosje J. Tuijn, Lisa Basten, Bert Hafkamp, Wilco C. Meijer, Bas Teusink, Willem M. de Vos, Gregor Reid, Wilbert Sybesma

Abstract

The lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is the most studied probiotic bacterium with proven health benefits upon oral intake, including the alleviation of diarrhea. The mission of the Yoba for Life foundation is to provide impoverished communities in Africa increased access to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG under the name Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba 2012, world's first generic probiotic strain. We have been able to overcome the strain's limitations to grow in food matrices like milk, by formulating a dried starter consortium with Streptococcus thermophilus that enables the propagation of both strains in milk and other food matrices. The affordable seed culture is used by people in resource-poor communities. We used S. thermophilus C106 as an adjuvant culture for the propagation of L. rhamnosus yoba 2012 in a variety of fermented foods up to concentrations, because of its endogenous proteolytic activity, ability to degrade lactose and other synergistic effects. Subsequently, L. rhamnosus could reach final titers of 1E+09 CFU ml(-1), which is sufficient to comply with the recommended daily dose for probiotics. The specific metabolic interactions between the two strains were derived from the full genome sequences of L. rhamnosus GG and S. thermophilus C106. The piliation of the L. rhamnosus yoba 2012, required for epithelial adhesion and inflammatory signaling in the human host, was stable during growth in milk for two rounds of fermentation. Sachets prepared with the two strains, yoba 2012 and C106, retained viability for at least 2 years. A stable dried seed culture has been developed which facilitates local and low-cost production of a wide range of fermented foods that subsequently act as delivery vehicles for beneficial bacteria to communities in east Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Turkey 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 134 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Researcher 16 12%
Other 9 7%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 31 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 11 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 7%
Engineering 6 4%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 37 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2017.
All research outputs
#673,614
of 19,293,994 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Cell Factories
#11
of 1,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,895
of 386,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Cell Factories
#2
of 140 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,293,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,366 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 386,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 140 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.