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Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study: a randomised controlled trial of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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451 Mendeley
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Title
Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study: a randomised controlled trial of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0491-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Daniels, Anne-Louise M. Heath, Sheila M. Williams, Sonya L. Cameron, Elizabeth A. Fleming, Barry J. Taylor, Ben J. Wheeler, Rosalind S. Gibson, Rachael W. Taylor

Abstract

In 2002, the World Health Organization recommended that the age for starting complementary feeding should be changed from 4 to 6 months of age to 6 months. Although this change in age has generated substantial debate, surprisingly little attention has been paid to whether advice on how to introduce complementary foods should also be changed. It has been proposed that by 6 months of age most infants will have developed sufficient motor skills to be able to feed themselves rather than needing to be spoon-fed by an adult. This has the potential to predispose infants to better growth by fostering better energy self-regulation, however no randomised controlled trials have been conducted to determine the benefits and risks of such a "baby-led" approach to complementary feeding. This is of particular interest given the widespread use of "Baby-Led Weaning" by parents internationally. The Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study aims to assess the efficacy and acceptability of a modified version of Baby-Led Weaning that has been altered to address potential concerns with iron status, choking and growth faltering. The BLISS study will recruit 200 families from Dunedin, New Zealand, who book into the region's only maternity hospital. Parents will be randomised into an intervention (BLISS) or control group for a 12-month intervention with further follow-up at 24 months of age. Both groups will receive the standard Well Child care provided to all parents in New Zealand. The intervention group will receive additional parent contacts (n = 8) for support and education on BLISS from before birth to 12 months of age. Outcomes of interest include body mass index at 12 months of age (primary outcome), energy self-regulation, iron and zinc intake and status, diet quality, choking, growth faltering and acceptability to parents. This study is expected to provide insight into the feasibility of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding and the extent to which this method of feeding affects infant body weight, diet quality and iron and zinc status. Results of this study will provide important information for health care professionals, parents and health policy makers. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001133820 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 451 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 448 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 96 21%
Student > Master 63 14%
Student > Postgraduate 39 9%
Researcher 31 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 7%
Other 84 19%
Unknown 108 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 143 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 106 24%
Psychology 23 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 4%
Social Sciences 9 2%
Other 28 6%
Unknown 125 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2019.
All research outputs
#677,480
of 15,096,298 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#53
of 1,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,033
of 363,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#4
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,096,298 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,908 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,743 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.