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Relative and contextual contribution of different sources to the composition and abundance of indoor air bacteria in residences

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
103 Mendeley
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Title
Relative and contextual contribution of different sources to the composition and abundance of indoor air bacteria in residences
Published in
Microbiome, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40168-015-0128-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marzia Miletto, Steven E. Lindow

Abstract

The study of the microbial communities in the built environment is of critical importance as humans spend the majority of their time indoors. While the microorganisms in living spaces, especially those in the air, can impact health and well-being, little is known of their identity and the processes that determine their assembly. We investigated the source-sink relationships of airborne bacteria in 29 homes in the San Francisco Bay Area. Samples taken in the sites expected to be source habitats for indoor air microbes were analyzed by 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. The community composition was related to the characteristics of the household collected at the time of sampling, including the number of residents and pets, activity levels, frequency of cooking and vacuum cleaning, extent of natural ventilation, and abundance and type of vegetation surrounding the building. Indoor air harbored a diverse bacterial community dominated by Diaphorobacter sp., Propionibacterium sp., Sphingomonas sp., and Alicyclobacillus sp. Source-sink analysis suggested that outdoor air was the primary source of indoor air microbes in most homes. Bacterial phylogenetic diversity and relative abundance in indoor air did not differ statistically from that in outdoor air. Moreover, the abundance of bacteria in outdoor air was positively correlated with that in indoor air, as would be expected if outdoor air was the main contributor to the bacterial community in indoor bioaerosols. The number of residents, presence of pets, and local tap water also influenced the diversity and size of indoor air microbes. The bacterial load in air increased with the number of residents, activity, and frequency of natural ventilation, and the proportion of bacteria putatively derived from skin increased with the number of residents. Vacuum cleaning increased the signature of pet- and floor-derived bacteria in indoor air, while the frequency of natural ventilation decreased the relative abundance of tap water-derived microorganisms in air. Indoor air in residences harbors a diverse bacterial community originating from both outdoor and indoor sources and is strongly influenced by household characteristics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 102 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Master 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 22%
Environmental Science 21 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 9%
Engineering 9 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 7%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 21 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,027,119
of 19,163,209 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#350
of 1,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,965
of 386,227 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#27
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,163,209 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 386,227 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.