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Indirect costs and public finance consequences of heart failure in Poland, 2012–2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Indirect costs and public finance consequences of heart failure in Poland, 2012–2015
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-6034-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Błażej Łyszczarz

Abstract

As a consequence of unfavourable epidemiological trends and the development of disease management, the economic aspects of heart failure (HF) have become more and more important. The costs of treatment (direct costs) appear to be the most frequently addressed topic in the economic research on HF; however, less is known about productivity losses (indirect costs) and the public finance burden attributable to the disease. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the indirect costs and public finance consequences of HF in Poland in the period 2012-2015. The study uses a societal perspective and a prevalence-based top-down approach to estimate the following components of HF indirect costs: absenteeism of the sick and their caregivers, presenteeism of the sick, disability, and premature mortality. The human capital method has been chosen to identify the value of productivity losses attributable to HF and the public finance consequences of the disease. Deterministic sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the robustness of the results. The total indirect costs of HF in Poland were €871.9 million in 2012, and they increased to €945.3 million in 2015. In the period investigated, these costs accounted for 0.212-0.224% of GDP, an equivalent of 22.63€-24.59€ per capita. Mortality proved to be the main driver of productivity losses, with 59.3-63.4% of the total costs depending on year, followed by presenteeism (21.1-22.5%), disability (11.1-14.2%) and the sick's absenteeism (3.3-4.0%). The cost of caregivers' absenteeism was unimportant. The social insurance expenditure for benefits associated with HF accounted for €40.7 million in 2012 and €45.6 million in 2015 (0.56-0.59% expenditure for all diseases). The potential public revenue losses associated with HF were €262.7-€287.9 million. Sensitivity analysis showed that the costs varied by - 12.1% to + 28.8% depending on the model parameter values. HF is a substantial burden on the economy and public finance in Poland. By confronting the disease more effectively, the length and quality of life for those affected by HF could be improved, but society as a whole could also benefit from the increased economic output.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 36%
Other 2 18%
Professor 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2018.
All research outputs
#2,148,574
of 13,536,508 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,534
of 9,349 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,210
of 265,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,508 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,349 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,872 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.