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Are parents and adolescents in agreement on reporting of recurrent non-specific low back pain in adolescents? A cross-sectional descriptive study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, December 2015
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Title
Are parents and adolescents in agreement on reporting of recurrent non-specific low back pain in adolescents? A cross-sectional descriptive study
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0518-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew Chiwaridzo, Nirmala Naidoo

Abstract

Non-specific low back pain is a prevalent symptom in adolescents and is recurrent in some instances. Recent studies have highlighted the marked impact the condition has on daily life of adolescents. However, it is unclear if parents of adolescents reporting recurrent non-specific low back pain know about their child's status. The purpose of the study was to determine the level of agreement between adolescents and their parents in reporting recurrent non-specific low back pain in Harare, Zimbabwe. This cross-sectional study formed part of a large study carried out to ascertain the prevalence of non-specific low back pain in Zimbabwean adolescents. Six hundred and twenty (n = 620) Medical Health Questionnaires were sent to parents. School-children with returned questionnaires and informed consents signed were subsequently eligible to participate. A reliable and validated low back pain study questionnaire was administered to 544 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 19 years randomly selected from government-administered schools. The questionnaire sought to determine adolescents with recurrent NSLBP. The Kappa statistic (k) was used to analyse agreement between adolescents and parental reports on recurrent NSLBP status. Parental and school-children response rates were acceptable (90.3 and 97.8 %, respectively). The prevalence of recurrent NSLBP was 28.8 % [95 % Confidence Interval, CI = 26.0-31.6]. Both sexes were equally affected [χ (2) (1) =0.19, p = 0.67]. The prevalence increased with age in both sexes [χ (2) trend =90.9, p < 0.001]. Parental reports agreed in 16.3 and 98.7 % for the adolescents with and without recurrent NSLBP respectively. The value of kappa (k) was 0.20 [SE = 0.04; 95 % CI, 0.13-0.27] with a prevalence index and bias index of -0.65 and 0.23, respectively. These results suggest poor strength of the agreement. Recurrent non-specific low back pain is relatively common among Zimbabwean adolescents. Most of the parents of school-children with recurrent non-specific low back pain are unaware of the low back pain status of their children. Although this does not dismiss the relevance of non-specific low back pain reported during adolescence, these findings create a need to involve parents in awareness or preventive initiatives against low back pain in schools.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Other 5 10%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 16%
Sports and Recreations 8 16%
Psychology 3 6%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,757,615
of 6,737,133 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#823
of 962 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,887
of 284,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#45
of 50 outputs
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