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Engineering xylose metabolism in thraustochytrid T18

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, September 2018
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1 tweeter

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Engineering xylose metabolism in thraustochytrid T18
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13068-018-1246-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandra Merkx-Jacques, Holly Rasmussen, Denise M. Muise, Jeremy J. R. Benjamin, Haila Kottwitz, Kaitlyn Tanner, Michael T. Milway, Laura M. Purdue, Mark A. Scaife, Roberto E. Armenta, David L. Woodhall

Abstract

Thraustochytrids are heterotrophic, oleaginous, marine protists with a significant potential for biofuel production. High-value co-products can off-set production costs; however, the cost of raw materials, and in particular carbon, is a major challenge to developing an economical viable production process. The use of hemicellulosic carbon derived from agricultural waste, which is rich in xylose and glucose, has been proposed as a sustainable and low-cost approach. Thraustochytrid strain T18 is a commercialized environmental isolate that readily consumes glucose, attaining impressive biomass, and oil production levels. However, neither thraustochytrid growth capabilities in the presence of xylose nor a xylose metabolic pathway has been described. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize the xylose metabolism pathway of T18 and, through genetic engineering, develop a strain capable of growth on hemicellulosic sugars. Characterization of T18 performance in glucose/xylose media revealed diauxic growth and copious extracellular xylitol production. Furthermore, T18 did not grow in media containing xylose as the only carbon source. We identified, cloned, and functionally characterized a xylose isomerase. Transcriptomics indicated that this xylose isomerase gene is upregulated when xylose is consumed by the cells. Over-expression of the native xylose isomerase in T18, creating strain XI 16, increased xylose consumption from 5.2 to 7.6 g/L and reduced extracellular xylitol from almost 100% to 68%. Xylose utilization efficiency of this strain was further enhanced by over-expressing a heterologous xylulose kinase to reduce extracellular xylitol to 20%. Moreover, the ability to grow in media containing xylose as a sole sugar was dependent on the copy number of both xylose isomerase and xylulose kinase present. In fed-batch fermentations, the best xylose metabolizing isolate, XI-XK 7, used 137 g of xylose versus 39 g by wild type and produced more biomass and fatty acid. The presence of a typically prokaryotic xylose isomerase and xylitol production through a typically eukaryotic xylose reductase pathway in T18 is the first report of an organism naturally encoding enzymes from two native xylose metabolic pathways. Our newly engineered strains pave the way for the growth of T18 on waste hemicellulosic feedstocks for biofuel production.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 17%
Chemical Engineering 4 13%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,493,601
of 13,533,246 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#594
of 1,034 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,473
of 265,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,533,246 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,034 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.