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Maternal cadmium, iron and zinc levels, DNA methylation and birth weight

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, July 2015
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Title
Maternal cadmium, iron and zinc levels, DNA methylation and birth weight
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40360-015-0020-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adriana C. Vidal, Viktoriya Semenova, Thomas Darrah, Avner Vengosh, Zhiqing Huang, Katherine King, Monica D. Nye, Rebecca Fry, David Skaar, Rachel Maguire, Amy Murtha, Joellen Schildkraut, Susan Murphy, Cathrine Hoyo

Abstract

Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous and environmentally persistent toxic metal that has been implicated in neurotoxicity, carcinogenesis and obesity and essential metals including zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) may alter these outcomes. However mechanisms underlying these relationships remain limited. We examined whether maternal Cd levels during early pregnancy were associated with offspring DNA methylation at regulatory sequences of genomically imprinted genes and weight at birth, and whether Fe and Zn altered these associations. Cd, Fe and Zn were measured in maternal blood of 319 women ≤12 weeks gestation. Offspring umbilical cord blood leukocyte DNA methylation at regulatory differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of 8 imprinted genes was measured using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Regression models were used to examine the relationships among Cd, Fe, Zn, and DMR methylation and birth weight. Elevated maternal blood Cd levels were associated with lower birth weight (p = 0.03). Higher maternal blood Cd levels were also associated with lower offspring methylation at the PEG3 DMR in females (β = 0.55, se = 0.17, p = 0.05), and at the MEG3 DMR in males (β = 0.72, se = 0.3, p = 0.08), however the latter association was not statistically significant. Associations between Cd and PEG3 and PLAGL1 DNA methylation were stronger in infants born to women with low concentrations of Fe (p < 0.05). Our data suggest the association between pre-natal Cd and offspring DNA methylation at regulatory sequences of imprinted genes may be sex- and gene-specific. Essential metals such as Zn may mitigate DNA methylation response to Cd exposure. Larger studies are required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 109 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 20%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Professor 8 7%
Other 24 21%
Unknown 19 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 6%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 24 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2015.
All research outputs
#9,027,467
of 11,285,775 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#174
of 235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,740
of 316,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#9
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,285,775 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 235 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.