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Atypical cerebral and cerebellar language organisation: a case study

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebellum & Ataxias, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Atypical cerebral and cerebellar language organisation: a case study
Published in
Cerebellum & Ataxias, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40673-015-0036-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kim van Dun, Elke De Witte, Wendy Van Daele, Wim Van Hecke, Mario Manto, Peter Mariën

Abstract

In the majority of right-handed subjects, language processing is subserved by a close interplay between the left cerebral hemisphere and right cerebellum. Within this network, the dominant fronto-insular region and the contralateral posterior cerebellum are crucially implicated in oral language production. We report atypical anatomoclinical findings in a right-handed patient with an extensive right cerebellar infarction and an older left fronto-insular stroke. Standardised neurolinguistic and neurocognitive test batteries were performed. In addition, fMRI, DTI, and SPECT results are reported. In this patient, disruption of the cerebellocerebral language network due to vascular damage in the left fronto-insular region and right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory did not induce any speech or language deficits. By contrast, executive and behavioural disturbances were found after the right cerebellar stroke. Evidence from fMRI and DTI suggests atypical bilateral language representation (Laterality Index = +0,11). At the cerebellar level, fMRI showed more activated voxels in the left than in the right hemisphere (Laterality Index = +0,66). We hypothesise congenital bilateral language representation in this patient which might be more advantageous than a typically lateralised distribution of linguistic functions to compensate acute damage to critical language regions. The more activated left cerebellum possibly compensated the functional loss in the right cerebellum after acute damage due to bilateral organisation of language function. However, more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Neuroscience 4 18%
Psychology 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2015.
All research outputs
#4,049,321
of 14,599,266 outputs
Outputs from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#18
of 81 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,526
of 360,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,599,266 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 360,963 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.