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Assessing changing weather and the El Niño Southern Oscillation impacts on cattle rabies outbreaks and mortality in Costa Rica (1985–2016)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, September 2018
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Title
Assessing changing weather and the El Niño Southern Oscillation impacts on cattle rabies outbreaks and mortality in Costa Rica (1985–2016)
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12917-018-1588-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabine E. Hutter, Annemarie Käsbohrer, Silvia Lucia Fallas González, Bernal León, Katharina Brugger, Mario Baldi, L. Mario Romero, Yan Gao, Luis Fernando Chaves

Abstract

Rabies is a major zoonotic disease affecting humans, domestic and wildlife mammals. Cattle are the most important domestic animals impacted by rabies virus in the New World, leading to thousands of cattle deaths per year and eliciting large economic losses. In the New World, virus transmission in cattle is primarily associated with Desmodus rotundus, the common vampire bat. This study analyses the association of weather fluctuations and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), with the occurrence and magnitude, in terms of associated mortality, of cattle rabies outbreaks. Data from the 100 cattle rabies outbreaks recorded between 1985 and 2016 in Costa Rica were analyzed. Periodograms for time series of rabies outbreaks and the El Niño 4 index were estimated. Seasonality was studied using a seasonal boxplot. The association between epidemiological and climatic time series was studied via cross wavelet coherence analysis. Retrospective space-time scan cluster analyses were also performed. Finally, seasonal autoregressive time series models were fitted to study linear associations between monthly number of outbreaks, monthly mortality rates and the El Niño 4 index, temperature, and rainfall. Large rabies mortality occurred towards the Atlantic basin of the country. Outbreak occurrence and size were not directly associated with ENSO, but were sensitive to weather variables impacted by ENSO. Both, ENSO phases and rabies outbreaks, showed a similar 5 year period in their oscillations. Cattle rabies mortality and outbreak occurrence increased with temperature, whereas outbreak occurrence decreased with rainfall. These results suggest that special weather conditions might favor the occurrence of cattle rabies outbreaks. Further efforts are necessary to articulate the mechanisms underpinning the association between weather changes and cattle rabies outbreaks. One hypothesis is that exacerbation of cattle rabies outbreaks might be mediated by impacts of weather conditions on common vampire bat movement and access to food resources on its natural habitats. Further eco-epidemiological field studies could help to understand rabies virus transmission ecology, and to propose sound interventions to control this major veterinary public health problem.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 20%
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Lecturer 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 17 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 19 29%
Unknown 17 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,774,476
of 13,536,508 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#1,253
of 1,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,086
of 265,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,995 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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