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Behind the wheel: community consultation informs adaptation of safe-transport program for older drivers

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
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Title
Behind the wheel: community consultation informs adaptation of safe-transport program for older drivers
Published in
BMC Research Notes, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1745-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristy Coxon, Lisa Keay

Abstract

Safe-transport is important to well-being in later life but balancing safety and independence for older drivers can be challenging. While self-regulation is a promising tool to promote road safety, more research is required to optimise programs. Qualitative research was used to inform the choice and adaptation of a safe-transport education program for older drivers. Three focus groups were conducted with older drivers living in northwest Sydney to explore four key areas related to driving in later life including aged-based licensing, stopping or limiting driving, barriers to driving cessation and alternative modes of transportation. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four categories emerged from the data; bad press for older drivers, COMPETENCE not age, call for fairness in licensing regulations, and hanging up the keys: It's complicated! Two key issues being (1) older drivers wanted to drive for as long as possible but (2) were not prepared for driving cessation; guided the choice and adaption of the Knowledge Enhances Your Safety (KEYS) program. This program was adapted for the Australian context and focus group findings raised the need for practical solutions, including transport alternatives, to be added. Targeted messages were developed from the data using the Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM), allowing the education to be tailored to the individual's stage of behaviour change. Adapting our program based on insights gained from community consultation should ensure the program is sensitive to the needs, skills and preferences of older drivers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 20%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 8 20%
Social Sciences 5 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 13 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,211,554
of 14,482,479 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#744
of 3,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,127
of 363,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#86
of 413 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,482,479 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,270 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 413 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.