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Ribosomal protein and biogenesis factors affect multiple steps during movement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon

Overview of attention for article published in Mobile DNA, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Ribosomal protein and biogenesis factors affect multiple steps during movement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon
Published in
Mobile DNA, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13100-015-0053-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susmitha Suresh, Hyo Won Ahn, Kartikeya Joshi, Arun Dakshinamurthy, Arun Kannanganat, David J. Garfinkel, Philip J. Farabaugh

Abstract

A large number of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cellular factors modulate the movement of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1. Surprisingly, a significant number of chromosomal genes required for Ty1 transposition encode components of the translational machinery, including ribosomal proteins, ribosomal biogenesis factors, protein trafficking proteins and protein or RNA modification enzymes. To assess the mechanistic connection between Ty1 mobility and the translation machinery, we have determined the effect of these mutations on ribosome biogenesis and Ty1 transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Lack of genes encoding ribosomal proteins or ribosome assembly factors causes reduced accumulation of the ribosomal subunit with which they are associated. In addition, these mutations cause decreased Ty1 + 1 programmed translational frameshifting, and reduced Gag protein accumulation despite at least normal levels of Ty1 mRNA. Several ribosome subunit mutations increase the level of both an internally initiated Ty1 transcript and its encoded truncated Gag-p22 protein, which inhibits transposition. Together, our results suggest that this large class of cellular genes modulate Ty1 transposition through multiple pathways. The effects are largely post-transcriptional acting at a variety of levels that may include translation initiation, protein stability and subcellular protein localization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Engineering 1 4%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2015.
All research outputs
#7,115,093
of 12,378,687 outputs
Outputs from Mobile DNA
#129
of 181 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,956
of 329,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mobile DNA
#9
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,687 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 181 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.