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A chemosynthetic weed: the tubeworm Sclerolinum contortum is a bipolar, cosmopolitan species

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
28 tweeters

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
A chemosynthetic weed: the tubeworm Sclerolinum contortum is a bipolar, cosmopolitan species
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0559-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Magdalena N. Georgieva, Helena Wiklund, James B. Bell, Mari H. Eilertsen, Rachel A. Mills, Crispin T. S. Little, Adrian G. Glover

Abstract

Sclerolinum (Annelida: Siboglinidae) is a genus of small, wiry deep-sea tubeworms that depend on an endosymbiosis with chemosynthetic bacteria for their nutrition, notable for their ability to colonise a multitude of reducing environments. Since the early 2000s, a Sclerolinum population has been known to inhabit sediment-hosted hydrothermal vents within the Bransfield Strait, Southern Ocean, and whilst remaining undescribed, it has been suggested to play an important ecological role in this ecosystem. Here, we show that the Southern Ocean Sclerolinum population is not a new species, but more remarkably in fact belongs to the species S. contortum, first described from an Arctic mud volcano located nearly 16,000 km away. Our new data coupled with existing genetic studies extend the range of this species across both polar oceans and the Gulf of Mexico. Our analyses show that the populations of this species are structured on a regional scale, with greater genetic differentiation occurring between rather than within populations. Further details of the external morphology and tube structure of S. contortum are revealed through confocal and SEM imaging, and the ecology of this worm is discussed. These results shed further insight into the plasticity and adaptability of this siboglinid group to a range of reducing conditions, and into the levels of gene flow that occur between populations of the same species over a global extent.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 39 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 25%
Student > Bachelor 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 39%
Environmental Science 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,351,288
of 16,581,438 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#376
of 2,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,489
of 373,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#38
of 231 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,581,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,775 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,026 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 231 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.