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Chromosomal variation among populations of a fungus-farming ant: implications for karyotype evolution and potential restriction to gene flow

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Chromosomal variation among populations of a fungus-farming ant: implications for karyotype evolution and potential restriction to gene flow
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1247-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danon Clemes Cardoso, Jürgen Heinze, Mariana Neves Moura, Maykon Passos Cristiano

Abstract

Intraspecific variation in chromosome structure may cause genetic incompatibilities and thus provides the first step in the formation of species. In ants, chromosome number varies tremendously from 2n = 2 to 2n = 120, and several studies have revealed considerable variation in karyotype within species. However, most previous studies were limited to the description of chromosome number and morphology, and more detailed karyomorphometric analyses may reveal additional, substantial variation. Here, we studied karyotype length, genome size, and phylogeography of five populations of the fungus-farming ant Trachymyrmex holmgreni in order to detect potential barriers to gene flow. Chromosome number and morphology did not vary among the five populations, but karyotype length and genome size were significantly higher in the southernmost populations than in the northern populations of this ant. Individuals or colonies with different karyotype lengths were not observed. Karyotype length variation appears to result from variation in centromere length. T. holmgreni shows considerable variation in karyotype length and might provide a second example of centromere drive in ants, similar to what has previously been observed in Solenopsis fire ants. Whether this variation leads to genetic incompatibilities between the different populations remains to be studied.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 25%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 33%
Engineering 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2019.
All research outputs
#5,029,152
of 15,926,863 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,385
of 2,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,488
of 278,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,926,863 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,733 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,632 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them