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Asymmetric expression of H19 and ADIPOQ in concave/convex paravertebral muscles is associated with severe adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Medicine, September 2018
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Title
Asymmetric expression of H19 and ADIPOQ in concave/convex paravertebral muscles is associated with severe adolescent idiopathic scoliosis
Published in
Molecular Medicine, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s10020-018-0049-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heng Jiang, Fu Yang, Tao Lin, Wei Shao, Yichen Meng, Jun Ma, Ce Wang, Rui Gao, Xuhui Zhou

Abstract

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common paediatric spinal deformity. The etiology and pathology of AIS remain unexplained, and have been reported to involve a combination of genetic and epigenetic factors. Since paravertebral muscle imbalance plays an important role in the onset and progression of scoliosis, we aimed to investigate transcriptomic differences by RNA-seq and identify significantly differentially expressed transcripts in two sides of paravertebral muscle in AIS. RNA-seq was performed on 5 pairs of paravertebral muscle from 5 AIS patients. Significantly differentially expressed transcripts were validated by quantitative reverse polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression difference was correlated to clinical characteristics. We demonstrated that ADIPOQ mRNA and H19 is significantly differentially expressed between two sides of paravertebral muscle, relatively specific in the context of AIS. Relatively low H19 and high ADIPOQ mRNA expression levels in concave-sided muscle are associated with larger spinal curve and earlier age at initiation. We identified miR-675-5p encoded by H19 as a mechanistic regulator of ADIPOQ expression in AIS. We demonstrated that significantly reduced CCCTC-binding factor (CCTF) occupancy in the imprinting control region (ICR) of the H19 gene in the concave-sided muscle contributes to down-regulated H19 expression. RNA-seq revealed transcriptomic differences between two sides of paravertebral muscle in AIS patients. Our findings imply that transcriptomic differences caused by epigenetic factors in affected individuals may account for the structural and functional imbalance of paravertebral muscle, which can expand our etiologic understanding of this disease.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 19%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2018.
All research outputs
#14,675,892
of 16,638,522 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Medicine
#749
of 848 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#240,618
of 280,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
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