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Effects of peripheral nerve injury on parvalbumin expression in adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, December 2015
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Title
Effects of peripheral nerve injury on parvalbumin expression in adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12868-015-0232-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tom Medici, Peter J. Shortland

Abstract

Parvalbumin (PV) is a calcium binding protein that identifies a subpopulation of proprioceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is also expressed in a high proportion of muscle afferents but its relationship to PV is unclear. Little is known of the phenotypic responses of muscle afferents to nerve injury. Sciatic nerve axotomy or L5 spinal nerve ligation and section (SNL) lesions were used to explore these issues in adult rats using immunocytochemistry. In naive animals, the mean PV expression was 25 % of L4 or L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and this was unchanged 2 weeks after sciatic nerve axotomy. Colocalization studies with the injury marker activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) showed that approximately 24 % of PV neurons expressed ATF3 after sciatic nerve axotomy suggesting that PV may show a phenotypic switch from injured to uninjured neurons. This possibility was further assessed using the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) injury model where injured and uninjured neurons are located in different DRGs. Two weeks after L5 SNL there was no change in total PV staining and essentially all L5 PV neurons expressed ATF3. Additionally, there was no increase in PV-ir in the adjacent uninjured L4 DRG cells. Co-labelling of DRG neurons revealed that less than 2 % of PV neurons normally expressed CGRP and no colocalization was seen after injury. These experiments clearly show that axotomy does not produce down regulation of PV protein in the DRG. Moreover, this lack of change is not due to a phenotypic switch in PV immunoreactive (ir) neurons, or de novo expression of PV-ir in uninjured neurons after nerve injury. These results further illustrate differences that occur when muscle afferents are injured as compared to cutaneous afferents.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 58 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 25%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 27%
Neuroscience 15 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Engineering 3 5%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2015.
All research outputs
#9,169,088
of 10,444,782 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#787
of 936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#257,808
of 317,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#35
of 39 outputs
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