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The first detection of Rickettsia aeschlimannii and Rickettsia massiliae in Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks, in northwest China

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, December 2015
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Title
The first detection of Rickettsia aeschlimannii and Rickettsia massiliae in Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks, in northwest China
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1242-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qing-Qing Wei, Li-Ping Guo, An-Dong Wang, Lu-Meng Mu, Ke Zhang, Chuang-Fu Chen, Wan-Jiang Zhang, Yuan-Zhi Wang

Abstract

Rickettsia spp. belonging to the spotted fever group (SFG) cause infections in humans, domestic animals and wildlife. At least five SFG rickettsial species have been reported in China, but the occurrence of Rickettsia aeschlimannii and R. massiliae in ticks has not been characterized to date. A total of 114 adult ticks were collected from sheep in Yining County, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, in northwest China. The ticks were identified from morphological and molecular characteristics. All samples were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and six genetic markers were used to determine the Rickettsia spp. in the ticks. The ticks collected were identified as Rhipicephalus turanicus. Three different lineages of Rh. turanicus from Yining County were discovered on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA and cox1. Twenty-one of the 114 samples (18.42%) were positive for rickettsial agents. Phylogenetic analysis based on six genetic sequences showed that three rickettsial species were present, namely: R. aeschlimannii (19.05%, 4/21), R. massiliae (19.05%, 4/21) and R. sibirica variant (61.90%, 13/21), which is clustered in the clade of R. sibirica subsp. sibirica. This is the first description of R. aeschlimannii and R. massiliae in China. R. massiliae, R. aeschlimannii and R. sibirica variant co-circulate in the region of the China-Kazakhstan border, in northwest China. Rickettsial agents in ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus from migrant birds, transported livestock, wildlife and human beings should be investigated further in the region of the China-Central Asian border.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 25%
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 31%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,263,706
of 8,255,097 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,637
of 2,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,500
of 306,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#124
of 161 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,255,097 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,292 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 161 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.