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Search for genes responsible for the remarkably high acetic acid tolerance of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii-derived interspecies hybrid strain

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2015
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Title
Search for genes responsible for the remarkably high acetic acid tolerance of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii-derived interspecies hybrid strain
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-2278-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margarida Palma, Filipa de Canaveira Roque, Joana Fernandes Guerreiro, Nuno Pereira Mira, Lise Queiroz, Isabel Sá-Correia

Abstract

Zygosaccharomyces bailii is considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast species due to its exceptional capacity to tolerate high concentrations of weak acids used as fungistatic preservatives at low pH. However, the mechanisms underlying its intrinsic remarkable tolerance to weak acids remain poorly understood. The identification of genes and mechanisms involved in Z. bailii acetic acid tolerance was on the focus of this study. For this, a genomic library from the highly acetic acid tolerant hybrid strain ISA1307, derived from Z. bailii and a closely related species and isolated from a sparkling wine production plant, was screened for acetic acid tolerance genes. This screen was based on the transformation of an acetic acid susceptible Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant deleted for the gene encoding the acetic acid resistance determinant transcription factor Haa1. The expression of 31 different DNA inserts from ISA1307 strain genome was found to significantly increase the host cell tolerance to acetic acid. The in silico analysis of these inserts was facilitated by the recently available genome sequence of this strain. In total, 65 complete or truncated ORFs were identified as putative determinants of acetic acid tolerance and an S. cerevisiae gene homologous to most of them was found. These include genes involved in cellular transport and transport routes, protein fate, protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism and transcription. The role of strong candidates in Z. bailii and S. cerevisiae acetic acid tolerance was confirmed based on homologous and heterologous expression analyses. ISA1307 genes homologous to S. cerevisiae genes GYP8, WSC4, PMT1, KTR7, RKR1, TIF3, ILV3 and MSN4 are proposed as strong candidate determinants of acetic acid tolerance. The ORF ZBAI_02295 that contains a functional domain associated to the uncharacterised integral membrane proteins of unknown function of the DUP family is also suggested as a relevant tolerance determinant. The genes ZbMSN4 and ZbTIF3, encoding a putative stress response transcription factor and a putative translation initiation factor, were confirmed as determinants of acetic acid tolerance in both Z. bailii and S. cerevisiae. This study provides valuable indications on the cellular components, pathways and processes to be targeted in order to control food spoilage by the highly acetic acid tolerant Z. bailii and Z. bailii-derived strains. Additionally, this information is essential to guide the improvement of yeast cells robustness against acetic acid if the objective is their use as cell factories.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 21%
Researcher 8 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Master 7 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 34%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Engineering 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#4,798,752
of 6,790,336 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#3,954
of 5,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,474
of 288,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#294
of 345 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,790,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,238 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 345 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.