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Malaria parasitaemia, anaemia and malnutrition in children less than 15 years residing in different altitudes along the slope of Mount Cameroon: prevalence, intensity and risk factors

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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109 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria parasitaemia, anaemia and malnutrition in children less than 15 years residing in different altitudes along the slope of Mount Cameroon: prevalence, intensity and risk factors
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2492-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rene Ning Teh, Irene Ule Ngole Sumbele, Derick Ndelle Meduke, Samuel Takang Ojong, Helen Kuokuo Kimbi

Abstract

Malaria, anaemia and malnutrition are frequently co-existing diseases that cause significant morbidity and mortality particularly among children. This study measured the prevalence, intensity and evaluated risk factors for malaria parasitaemia, anaemia and malnutrition among children living at low versus high altitude settings in the Mount Cameroon area. A cross-sectional community based survey involving 828 children aged 6 months to 14 years was conducted between July and November 2017. Malaria parasitaemia was confirmed by light microscopy, haemoglobin concentration was measured using an auto haematology analyser, nutritional status was determined from the anthropometric measurements collected, and socioeconomic status related variables by the use of questionnaire. Anaemia and malnutrition were defined according to World Health Organization standards. Associations between predictor variables and primary outcomes were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Malaria parasite and anaemia were prevalent in 41.7% and 56.2% of the children, respectively while, malnutrition prevalence was 34.8% with wasting, underweight and stunting occurring in 25.7%, 19.9% and 23.7% of them respectively. Overall malaria parasite geometric mean density was 413/µL of blood (range 100-27,060). The odds of having malaria parasitaemia was highest in children 5-9 years of age [odd ratio (OR) = 1.69, P = 0.006], living in lowland (OR = 1.48, P = 0.008) as well as those whose domestic water was collected from an open source (streams/springs) (OR = 1.81, P = 0.005) than their counterparts. Being < 5 years (OR = 3.15, P = < 0.001) or 5-9 years (OR = 2.20, P < 0.001) of age, having malaria parasite (OR = 2.07, P = < 0.001) and fever in the past 2 days (OR = 1.52, P < 0.04) were identified as significant risk factors of anaemia while the age group < 5 years was the only significant risk (OR = 3.09, P = < 0.001) associated with malnutrition. While age specific attention should be given in the control of malaria (5-9 years), anaemia (< 10 years) and malnutrition (< 5 years), the existing malaria control programmes should be revised to integrate anaemia and malnutrition control strategies so as to improve upon the health of the children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 17%
Researcher 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 6%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 37 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 35 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2018.
All research outputs
#8,109,525
of 15,622,089 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,316
of 4,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,886
of 276,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,622,089 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them