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Musculoskeletal conditions may increase the risk of chronic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
228 tweeters
facebook
17 Facebook pages

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

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142 Mendeley
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Title
Musculoskeletal conditions may increase the risk of chronic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-018-1151-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda Williams, Steven J. Kamper, John H. Wiggers, Kate M. O’Brien, Hopin Lee, Luke Wolfenden, Sze Lin Yoong, Emma Robson, James H. McAuley, Jan Hartvigsen, Christopher M. Williams

Abstract

Chronic diseases and musculoskeletal conditions have a significant global burden and frequently co-occur. Musculoskeletal conditions may contribute to the development of chronic disease; however, this has not been systematically synthesised. We aimed to investigate whether the most common musculoskeletal conditions, namely neck or back pain or osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, contribute to the development of chronic disease. We searched CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Medline in Process, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science to February 8, 2018, for cohort studies reporting adjusted estimates of the association between baseline musculoskeletal conditions (neck or back pain or osteoarthritis of the knee or hip) and subsequent diagnosis of a chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease or obesity). Two independent reviewers performed data extraction and assessed study quality. Adjusted hazard ratios were pooled using the generic inverse variance method in random effect models, regardless of the type of musculoskeletal condition or chronic disease. CRD42016039519. There were 13 cohort studies following 3,086,612 people. In the primary meta-analysis of adjusted estimates, osteoarthritis (n = 8 studies) and back pain (n = 2) were the exposures and cardiovascular disease (n = 8), cancer (n = 1) and diabetes (n = 1) were the outcomes. Pooled adjusted estimates from these 10 studies showed that people with a musculoskeletal condition have a 17% increase in the rate of developing a chronic disease compared to people without (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.13-1.22; I2 52%, total n = 2,686,113 people). This meta-analysis found that musculoskeletal conditions may increase the risk of chronic disease. In particular, osteoarthritis appears to increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Prevention and early treatment of musculoskeletal conditions and targeting associated chronic disease risk factors in people with long standing musculoskeletal conditions may play a role in preventing other chronic diseases. However, a greater understanding about why musculoskeletal conditions may increase the risk of chronic disease is needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 228 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 142 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 21%
Researcher 18 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 11%
Other 13 9%
Student > Bachelor 13 9%
Other 31 22%
Unknown 22 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 24%
Psychology 6 4%
Engineering 5 4%
Sports and Recreations 4 3%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 33 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 154. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2020.
All research outputs
#167,919
of 19,151,080 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#151
of 2,863 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,511
of 289,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,151,080 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,863 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them