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The effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and fruit and vegetable consumption on IVF outcomes: a review and presentation of original data

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and fruit and vegetable consumption on IVF outcomes: a review and presentation of original data
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12958-015-0133-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Firns, Vinicius Fernandes Cruzat, Kevin Noel Keane, Karen A. Joesbury, Andy H. Lee, Philip Newsholme, John L. Yovich

Abstract

Lifestyle factors including cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and nutritional habits impact on health, wellness, and the risk of chronic diseases. In the areas of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and pregnancy, lifestyle factors influence oocyte production, fertilization rates, pregnancy and pregnancy loss, while chronic, low-grade oxidative stress may underlie poor outcomes for some IVF cases. Here, we review the current literature and present some original, previously unpublished data, obtained from couples attending the PIVET Medical Centre in Western Australia. During the study, 80 % of females and 70 % of male partners completed a 1-week diary documenting their smoking, alcohol and fruit and vegetable intake. The subsequent clinical outcomes of their IVF treatment such as quantity of oocytes collected, fertilization rates, pregnancy and pregnancy loss were submitted to multiple regression analysis, in order to investigate the relationship between patients, treatment and the recorded lifestyle factors. Of significance, it was found that male smoking caused an increased risk of pregnancy loss (p = 0.029), while female smoking caused an adverse effect on ovarian reserve. Both alcohol consumption (β = 0.074, p < 0.001) and fruit and vegetable consumption (β = 0.034, p < 0.001) had positive effects on fertilization. Based on our results and the current literature, there is an important impact of lifestyle factors on IVF clinical outcomes. Currently, there are conflicting results regarding other lifestyle factors such as nutritional habits and alcohol consumption, but it is apparent that chronic oxidative stress induced by lifestyle factors and poor nutritional habits associate with a lower rate of IVF success.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 118 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 29 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 37 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2020.
All research outputs
#1,567,100
of 18,523,374 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#69
of 745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,506
of 335,763 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#4
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,523,374 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 745 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,763 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.