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Racial differences in associations between baseline patterns of radiographic osteoarthritis and multiple definitions of progression of hip osteoarthritis: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Racial differences in associations between baseline patterns of radiographic osteoarthritis and multiple definitions of progression of hip osteoarthritis: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0806-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bridget Foley, Rebecca J. Cleveland, Jordan B. Renner, Joanne M. Jordan, Amanda E. Nelson

Abstract

To identify baseline radiographic features that predict hip osteoarthritis (HOA) progression, and to explore differences in these associations by race. Radiographs from the community-based Johnston County OA Project were scored using Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade and for presence and location of joint space narrowing (JSN), osteophytes, and subchondral changes. Associations between these features and HOA progression (increase of at least 1 KL grade, interval hip replacement, range of motion [ROM, a reduction of ≥10° in internal rotation], or disability [increase of ≥0.2 in Health Assessment Questionnaire scores], or Any of these) were assessed using logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender, race, hip injury, BMI, education, smoking and follow-up time, accounting for multiple comparisons. Race interactions were assessed and analyses stratified as indicated. The sample (n = 1,422) included 40 % men and 26 % African American (AA) participants, with mean age 61 years and BMI 29 kg/m(2). The baseline frequency of radiographic hip OA (RHOA) between Caucasians and AAs was similar (23 %), although some radiographic features differed. AAs were more likely to have progression defined by ROM or disability or Any progression; Caucasians were more likely to have RHOA progression. JSN, subchondral sclerosis, and medial osteophytes were associated with increased RHOA progression overall; JSN was associated with disability progression only in AAs, while lateral osteophytes were associated with ROM progression only in Caucasians. AAs and Caucasians exhibited differences in the radiographic presentation and progression patterns of HOA, with AAs reporting progressive pain and disability, while Caucasians had more RHOA progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 22%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,629,707
of 21,639,423 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#271
of 2,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,762
of 402,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#25
of 294 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,639,423 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,864 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,363 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 294 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.