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Changes in active commuting and changes in physical activity in adults: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
47 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

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95 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in active commuting and changes in physical activity in adults: a cohort study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0323-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louise Foley, Jenna Panter, Eva Heinen, Richard Prins, David Ogilvie

Abstract

Active travel is associated with greater physical activity, but there is a dearth of research examining this relationship over time. We examined the longitudinal associations between change in time spent in active commuting and changes in recreational and total physical activity. Adult commuters working in Cambridge, United Kingdom completed questionnaires in 2009 and 2012, and a sub-set completed objective physical activity monitoring in 2010 and 2012. Commuting was assessed using a validated seven-day travel to work record. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was assessed using the Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire and combined heart rate and movement sensing. We used multivariable multinomial logistic regression models to examine associations between change in time spent in active commuting and tertiles of changes in time spent in recreational and total physical activity. Four hundred sixty-nine participants (67 % female, mean age 44 years) provided valid travel and self-reported physical activity data. Seventy-one participants (54 % female, mean age 45 years) provided valid travel and objectively measured physical activity data. A decrease in active commuting was associated with a greater likelihood of a decrease in self-reported total physical activity (relative risk ratio [RRR] 2.1, 95 % CI 1.1, 4.1). Correspondingly, an increase in active commuting was associated with a borderline significantly greater likelihood of an increase in self-reported total physical activity (RRR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.0, 3.4). No associations were seen between change in time spent in active commuting and change in time spent in either self-reported recreational physical activity or objectively measured physical activity. Changes in active commuting were associated with commensurate changes in total self-reported physical activity and we found no compensatory changes in self-reported recreational physical activity. Promoting active commuting has potential as a public health strategy to increase physical activity. Future longitudinal research would be useful to verify these findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 92 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 20%
Student > Master 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 6 6%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 24 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 17%
Sports and Recreations 13 14%
Social Sciences 11 12%
Psychology 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 31 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,012,832
of 20,206,018 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#410
of 1,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,568
of 392,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#43
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,206,018 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,791 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 392,816 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.