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Building school-based social capital through ‘We Act - Together for Health’ – a quasi-experimental study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
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Title
Building school-based social capital through ‘We Act - Together for Health’ – a quasi-experimental study
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-6026-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nanna W. Stjernqvist, Marianne Sabinsky, Antony Morgan, Ellen Trolle, Camilla Thyregod, Helle T. Maindal, Ane H. Bonde, Inge Tetens

Abstract

Social capital has been found to be positively associated with various health and well-being outcomes amongst children. Less is known about how social capital may be generated and specifically in relation to children in the school setting. Drawing on the social cohesion approach and the democratic health educational methodology IVAC (Investigation - Vision - Action - Change) the aim of this study was to examine the effect of the Health Promoting School intervention 'We Act - Together for Health' on children's cognitive social capital. A quasi-experimental controlled pre- and post-intervention study design was conducted with 548 participants (mean age 11.7 years). Cognitive social capital was measured as: horizontal social capital (trust and support in pupils); vertical social capital (trust and support in teachers); and a sense of belonging in the school using questions derived from the Health Behaviour in School Children study. A series of multilevel ordinal logistic regression analyses was performed for each outcome to estimate the effect of the intervention. The analyses showed no overall significant effect from the intervention on horizontal social capital or vertical social capital at the six-month follow-up. A negative effect was found on the sense of belonging in the school. Gender and grade appeared to be important for horizontal social capital, while grade was important for sense of belonging in the school. The results are discussed in relation to We Act's implementation process, our conceptual framework and methodological issues and can be used to direct future research in the field. The study finds that child participation in health education can affect the children's sense of belonging in the school, though without sufficient management support, this may have a negative effect. With low implementation fidelity regarding the Action and Change dimension of the intervention at both the school and class level, and with measurement issues regarding the concept of social capital, more research is needed to establish a firm conclusion on the importance of the children's active participation as a source for cognitive social capital creation in the school setting. https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN85203017.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 106 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 16%
Student > Master 17 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Researcher 8 8%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 24 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 12%
Psychology 11 10%
Sports and Recreations 6 6%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 35 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,176,226
of 13,565,336 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,303
of 9,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,090
of 265,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#7
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,565,336 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,354 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,181 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.