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Healthy diets ASAP – Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing methods protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Healthy diets ASAP – Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing methods protocol
Published in
Nutrition Journal, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12937-018-0396-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda J Lee, Sarah Kane, Meron Lewis, Elizabeth Good, Christina M Pollard, Timothy J Landrigan, Mathew Dick

Abstract

This paper describes the rationale, development and final protocol of the Healthy Diets Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing (ASAP) method which aims to assess, compare and monitor the price, price differential and affordability of healthy (recommended) and current (unhealthy) diets in Australia. The protocol is consistent with the International Network for Food and Obesity / non-communicable Diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support's (INFORMAS) optimal approach to monitor food price and affordability globally. The Healthy Diets ASAP protocol was developed based on literature review, drafting, piloting and revising, with key stakeholder consultation at all stages, including at a national forum. The protocol was developed in five parts. Firstly, for the healthy (recommended) and current (unhealthy) diet pricing tools; secondly for calculation of median and low-income household incomes; thirdly for store location and sampling; fourthly for price data collection, and; finally for analysis and reporting. The Healthy Diets ASAP protocol constitutes a standardised approach to assess diet price and affordability to inform development of nutrition policy actions to reduce rates of diet-related chronic disease in Australia. It demonstrates application of the INFORMAS optimum food price and affordability methods at country level. Its wide application would enhance monitoring and utility of dietary price and affordability data from a health perspective in Australia. The protocol could be adapted in other countries to monitor the price, price differential and affordability of current and healthy diets.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Unspecified 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 12 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Unspecified 4 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 9%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 14 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2020.
All research outputs
#1,938,953
of 19,247,212 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#479
of 1,347 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,002
of 290,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,247,212 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,347 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,399 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them