↓ Skip to main content

In vitro fertilization (IVF) in mammals: epigenetic and developmental alterations. Scientific and bioethical implications for IVF in humans

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Research, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 198)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
186 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
In vitro fertilization (IVF) in mammals: epigenetic and developmental alterations. Scientific and bioethical implications for IVF in humans
Published in
Biological Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40659-015-0059-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patricio Ventura-Juncá, Isabel Irarrázaval, Augusto J. Rolle, Juan I. Gutiérrez, Ricardo D. Moreno, Manuel J. Santos

Abstract

The advent of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in animals and humans implies an extraordinary change in the environment where the beginning of a new organism takes place. In mammals fertilization occurs in the maternal oviduct, where there are unique conditions for guaranteeing the encounter of the gametes and the first stages of development of the embryo and thus its future. During this period a major epigenetic reprogramming takes place that is crucial for the normal fate of the embryo. This epigenetic reprogramming is very vulnerable to changes in environmental conditions such as the ones implied in IVF, including in vitro culture, nutrition, light, temperature, oxygen tension, embryo-maternal signaling, and the general absence of protection against foreign elements that could affect the stability of this process. The objective of this review is to update the impact of the various conditions inherent in the use of IVF on the epigenetic profile and outcomes of mammalian embryos, including superovulation, IVF technique, embryo culture and manipulation and absence of embryo-maternal signaling. It also covers the possible transgenerational inheritance of the epigenetic alterations associated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), including its phenotypic consequences as is in the case of the large offspring syndrome (LOS). Finally, the important scientific and bioethical implications of the results found in animals are discussed in terms of the ART in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 185 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 40 22%
Student > Master 25 13%
Researcher 24 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 9%
Other 27 15%
Unknown 30 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 44 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 16%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 3%
Other 22 12%
Unknown 38 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,298,231
of 6,803,403 outputs
Outputs from Biological Research
#50
of 198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,360
of 291,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Research
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,803,403 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 198 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,545 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.