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Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for spiny-footed lizards, Acanthodactylus scutellatus group (Reptilia, Lacertidae) from arid regions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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Citations

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for spiny-footed lizards, Acanthodactylus scutellatus group (Reptilia, Lacertidae) from arid regions
Published in
BMC Research Notes, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1779-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara Cristina Lopes, Guillermo Velo-Antón, Paulo Pereira, Susana Lopes, Raquel Godinho, Pierre-André Crochet, José Carlos Brito

Abstract

Spiny-footed lizards constitute a diverse but scarcely studied genus. Microsatellite markers would help increasing the knowledge about species boundaries, patterns of genetic diversity and structure, and gene flow dynamics. We developed a set of 22 polymorphic microsatellite loci for cross-species amplification in three taxa belonging to the Acanthodactylus scutellatus species group, A. aureus, A. dumerili/A. senegalensis and A. longipes, and tested the same markers in two other members of the group, A. scutellatus and A. taghitensis. Amplifications in A. aureus, A. longipes and A. dumerili/A. senegalensis were successful, with markers exhibiting a number of alleles varying between 1 and 19. Expected and observed heterozygosity ranged, respectively, between 0.046-0.893 and 0.048-1.000. Moreover, 17 and 16 loci were successfully amplified in A. scutellatus and A. taghitensis, respectively. These markers are provided as reliable genetic tools to use in future evolutionary, behavioural and conservation studies involving species from the A. scutellatus group.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 50%
Researcher 1 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 50%
Environmental Science 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2015.
All research outputs
#3,081,085
of 6,792,385 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#797
of 1,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,792
of 292,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#62
of 152 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,792,385 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,813 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,732 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 152 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.