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Organ culture of seminiferous tubules using a modified soft agar culture system

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2018
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Title
Organ culture of seminiferous tubules using a modified soft agar culture system
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0997-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keykavos Gholami, Gholamreza Pourmand, Morteza Koruji, Sepideh Ashouri, Mehdi Abbasi

Abstract

In-vitro spermatogenesis in mammalian species is considered an important topic in reproductive biology. New strategies for achieving a complete version of spermatogenesis ex vivo have been conducted using an organ culture method or culture of testicular cells in a three-dimensional soft agar culture system (SACS). The aim of this study was to develop a new method that supports spermatogenesis to the meiotic phase and morphologically mature spermatozoa through the culture of testicular cells and seminiferous tubules (STs) in a modified SACS, respectively. First, enzymatically dissociated testicular cells and mechanically dissociated STs of neonatal mice were separately embedded in agarose and then placed on the flat surface of agarose gel half-soaked in the medium to continue culture with a gas-liquid interphase method. Following 40 days of culture, the meiotic (Scp3) and post-meiotic (Acr) gene expression in aggregates and STs was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results were complemented by immunohistochemistry. The presence of morphologically mature spermatozoa in the frozen sections of STs was demonstrated with hematoxylin and eosin staining. We observed Plzf- or Integrin α6-positive spermatogonia in both cultures after 40 days, indicating the potency of the culture system for both self-renewal and differentiation. This technique can be used as a valuable approach for performing research on spermatogenesis and translating it into the human clinical setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 28%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Engineering 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2018.
All research outputs
#12,030,868
of 13,568,727 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1,060
of 1,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#228,519
of 265,070 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,727 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,204 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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