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Nerves are more abundant than blood vessels in the degenerate human intervertebral disc

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Nerves are more abundant than blood vessels in the degenerate human intervertebral disc
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0889-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abbie L. A. Binch, Ashley A. Cole, Lee M. Breakwell, Antony L. R. Michael, Neil Chiverton, Laura B. Creemers, Alison K. Cross, Christine L. Le Maitre

Abstract

Chronic low back pain (LBP) is the most common cause of disability worldwide. New ideas surrounding LBP are emerging that are based on interactions between mechanical, biological and chemical influences on the human IVD. The degenerate IVD is proposed to be innervated by sensory nerve fibres and vascularised by blood vessels, and it is speculated to contribute to pain sensation. However, the incidence of nerve and blood vessel ingrowth, as well as whether these features are always associated, is unknown. We investigated the presence of nerves and blood vessels in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the IVD in a large population of human discs. Immunohistochemistry was performed with 61 human IVD samples, to identify and localise nerves (neurofilament 200 [NF200]/protein gene product 9.5) and blood vessels (CD31) within different regions of the IVD. Immunopositivity for NF200 was identified within all regions of the IVD within post-mortem tissues. Nerves were seen to protrude across lamellar ridges and through matrix towards NP cells. Nerves were identified deep within the NP and were in many cases, but not always, seen in close proximity to fissures or in areas where decreased matrix was seen. Fifteen percent of samples were degenerate and negative for nerves and blood vessels, whilst 16 % of all samples were degenerate with nerves and blood vessels. We identified 52 % of samples that were degenerate with nerves but no blood vessels. Interestingly, only 4 % ofall samples were degenerate with no nerves but positive for blood vessels. Of the 85 samples investigated, only 6 % of samples were non-degenerate without nerves and blood vessels and 7 % had nerves but no blood vessels. This study addresses the controversial topic of nerve and blood vessel ingrowth into the IVD in a large number of human samples. Our findings demonstrate that nerves are present within a large proportion of NP samples from degenerate IVDs. This study shows a possible link between nerve ingrowth and degeneration of the IVD and suggests that nerves can migrate in the absence of blood vessels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 70 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 16 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 13%
Neuroscience 6 8%
Engineering 6 8%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 17 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2016.
All research outputs
#846,587
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#160
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,719
of 344,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#31
of 315 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,451,992 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 315 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.