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Phylogenetic analysis of human Chlamydia pneumoniae strains reveals a distinct Australian indigenous clade that predates European exploration of the continent

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Phylogenetic analysis of human Chlamydia pneumoniae strains reveals a distinct Australian indigenous clade that predates European exploration of the continent
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-2281-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eileen Roulis, Nathan Bachmann, Michael Humphrys, Garry Myers, Wilhelmina Huston, Adam Polkinghorne, Peter Timms

Abstract

The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen, which has been found in a range of hosts including humans, marsupials and amphibians. Whole genome comparisons of human C. pneumoniae have previously highlighted a highly conserved nucleotide sequence, with minor but key polymorphisms and additional coding capacity when human and animal strains are compared. In this study, we sequenced three Australian human C. pneumoniae strains, two of which were isolated from patients in remote indigenous communities, and compared them to all available C. pneumoniae genomes. Our study demonstrated a phylogenetically distinct human C. pneumoniae clade containing the two indigenous Australian strains, with estimates that the most recent common ancestor of these strains predates the arrival of European settlers to Australia. We describe several polymorphisms characteristic to these strains, some of which are similar in sequence to animal C. pneumoniae strains, as well as evidence to suggest that several recombination events have shaped these distinct strains. Our study reveals a greater sequence diversity amongst both human and animal C. pneumoniae strains, and suggests that a wider range of strains may be circulating in the human population than current sampling indicates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 6%
Colombia 1 6%
Unknown 16 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2016.
All research outputs
#8,541,080
of 13,607,245 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,977
of 7,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,405
of 361,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#731
of 1,001 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,607,245 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,927 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 361,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,001 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.