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The effects of a strength and neuromuscular exercise programme for the lower extremity on knee load, pain and function in obese children and adolescents: study protocol for a randomised controlled…

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
434 Mendeley
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Title
The effects of a strength and neuromuscular exercise programme for the lower extremity on knee load, pain and function in obese children and adolescents: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-1091-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian Horsak, David Artner, Arnold Baca, Barbara Pobatschnig, Susanne Greber-Platzer, Stefan Nehrer, Barbara Wondrasch

Abstract

Childhood obesity is one of the most critical and accelerating health challenges throughout the world. It is a major risk factor for developing varus/valgus misalignments of the knee joint. The combination of misalignment at the knee and excess body mass may result in increased joint stresses and damage to articular cartilage. A training programme, which aims at developing a more neutral alignment of the trunk and lower limbs during movement tasks may be able to reduce knee loading during locomotion. Despite the large number of guidelines for muscle strength training and neuromuscular exercises that exist, most are not specifically designed to target the obese children and adolescent demographic. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate a training programme which combines strength and neuromuscular exercises specifically designed to the needs and limitations of obese children and adolescents and analyse the effects of the training programme from a biomechanical and clinical point of view. A single assessor-blinded, pre-test and post-test randomised controlled trial, with one control and one intervention group will be conducted with 48 boys and girls aged between 10 and 18 years. Intervention group participants will receive a 12-week neuromuscular and quadriceps/hip strength training programme. Three-dimensional (3D) gait analyses during level walking and stair climbing will be performed at baseline and follow-up sessions. The primary outcome parameters for this study will be the overall peak external frontal knee moment and impulse during walking. Secondary outcomes include the subscales of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), frontal and sagittal kinematics and kinetics for the lower extremities during walking and stair climbing, ratings of change in knee-related well-being, pain and function and adherence to the training programme. In addition, the training programme will be evaulated from a clinical and health status perspective by including the following analyses: cardiopulmonary testing to quantify aerobic fitness effects, anthropometric measures, nutritional status and psychological status to characterise the study sample. The findings will help to determine whether a neuromuscular and strength training exercise programme for the obese children population can reduce joint loading during locomotion, and thereby decrease the possible risk of developing degenerative joint diseases later in adulthood. ClinicalTrials NCT02545764 , Date of registration: 24 September 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 434 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 431 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 75 17%
Student > Bachelor 64 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 10%
Student > Postgraduate 31 7%
Researcher 26 6%
Other 59 14%
Unknown 137 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 83 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 66 15%
Sports and Recreations 53 12%
Psychology 19 4%
Social Sciences 10 2%
Other 45 10%
Unknown 158 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2016.
All research outputs
#384,876
of 8,485,607 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#100
of 2,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,601
of 316,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#8
of 177 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,485,607 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,633 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 177 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.