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Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
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Title
Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0526-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andriy Kovalchuk, Annegret Kohler, Francis Martin, Fred O. Asiegbu

Abstract

Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. Some of the fungal ABC transporter-encoding genes are also induced during the mycorrhiza formation. However, no experimental evidences of the direct involvement of fungal ABC transporters in this process are available so far. To facilitate the identification of fungal ABC proteins with a potential role in the establishment of the mycorrhizal symbiosis, we have performed an inventory of the ABC protein-encoding genes in the genomes of 25 species of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. We have identified, manually annotated and curated more than 1300 gene models of putative ABC protein-encoding genes. Out of those, more than 1000 models are predicted to encode functional proteins, whereas about 300 models represent gene fragments or putative pseudogenes. We have also performed the phylogenetic analysis of the identified sequences. The sets of ABC proteins in the mycorrhiza-forming species were compared to the related saprotrophic or plant-pathogenic fungal species. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of ABC genes in the genomes of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. Via comparison of transcriptomics data from different species, we have identified candidate groups of ABC transporters that might have a role in the process of the mycorrhiza formation. Results of our inventory will facilitate the identification of fungal transporters with a role in the mycorrhiza formation. We also provide the first data on ABC protein-coding genes for the phylum Glomeromycota and for orders Pezizales, Atheliales, Cantharellales and Sebacinales, contributing to the better knowledge of the diversity of this protein family within the fungal kingdom.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 3%
France 1 3%
Unknown 38 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 25%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,460,714
of 15,459,311 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,972
of 2,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,981
of 369,895 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#170
of 232 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,459,311 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,693 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,895 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 232 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.