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Catatonia in Ugandan children with nodding syndrome and effects of treatment with lorazepam: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, December 2015
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Title
Catatonia in Ugandan children with nodding syndrome and effects of treatment with lorazepam: a pilot study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1805-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angelina Kakooza-Mwesige, Dirk M. Dhossche, Richard Idro, Dickens Akena, Joyce Nalugya, Benard T. Opar

Abstract

Nodding syndrome (NS) is a severe neuropsychiatric syndrome of an unknown etiology affecting children and adolescents mostly in Eastern Africa. Symptoms of NS and catatonia seem to overlap. We investigated the presence and types of catatonic symptoms in NS and their response to one or two doses of lorazepam, the first-line treatment for catatonia. A cross-sectional descriptive study with systematic assessment of catatonia in 33 patients with NS using a modified version of the Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale. Sixteen patients met criteria for catatonia and were observed in an open and uncontrolled study to examine the effects of one or two doses of lorazepam in them. Sixteen of 33 patients with NS had an average of 5 catatonia symptoms and met criteria for catatonia. The highest scores were found for mutism, staring, poor eating/drinking, stupor, and grimacing. Excitement, rigidity, negativism and impulsivity had lower scores. None of the children had echolalia or echopraxia. In 6 children, there was a reduction of more than 50 % in catatonia ratings, representing a positive response to lorazepam. Three out of six children whose catatonia ratings did not change after the first dose, responded after administration of a second double dose. There were no unusual or critical side-effects. About half of a selected sample of children with NS met criteria for catatonia. Catatonia scores decreased in most patients after one or two doses of lorazepam. Larger, longer, and controlled studies are warranted to assess the prevalence of catatonia in NS and to assess the use of lorazepam in NS through its effects on catatonia. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02462109 Date of formal registration: June 2, 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Postgraduate 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 44%
Psychology 4 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2016.
All research outputs
#13,739,752
of 20,610,267 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,145
of 4,046 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#228,353
of 398,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#222
of 432 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,610,267 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,046 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 398,278 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 432 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.