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Evaluating the referral preferences and consultation requests of primary care physicians with otolaryngology – head and neck surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, December 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating the referral preferences and consultation requests of primary care physicians with otolaryngology – head and neck surgery
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0114-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

John R. Scott, Eric Wong, Leigh J Sowerby

Abstract

No literature exists which examines referral preferences to, or the consultation process with, Otolaryngology. In a recent Canadian Medical Association nation-wide survey of General Practitioners and Family Physicians, Otolaryngology was listed as the second-most problematic specialty for referrals. The purpose of this study was to learn about and improve upon the referral process between primary care physicians (PCPs) and Otolaryngology at an academic centre in Southwestern Ontario. PCPs who actively refer patients to Otolaryngology within the catchment area of Western University were asked to complete a short paper-based questionnaire. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 50 PCPs were surveyed. Subspecialty influenced 90.0 % of the referrals made. Specialist wait times altered 58.0 % of referrals. All PCPs preferred to communicate via fax. Half of those surveyed wanted clinical notes from every encounter. Seventy-four percent of respondents wanted inappropriate referrals forwarded to the proper specialist automatically. Twenty-two percent of those surveyed were satisfied with current wait times. A central referral system was favored by 74 % of PCPs. Improvements could help streamline the referral and consultation practices with Otolaryngology in Southwestern Ontario. A central referral system and reduction in the frequency of consultative reports can be considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 December 2015.
All research outputs
#3,380,631
of 6,896,042 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#53
of 172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,468
of 300,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#5
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,896,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 172 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.