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Determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in White British and South Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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47 Dimensions

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84 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in White British and South Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0831-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kanta Kumar, Karim Raza, Peter Nightingale, Robert Horne, Sarah Chapman, Sheila Greenfield, Paramjit Gill

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory disease causing joint damage, disability, and reduced life expectancy. Highly effective drugs are now available for the treatment of RA. However, poor adherence to drug regimens remains a significant barrier to improving clinical outcomes in RA. Poor adherence has been shown to be linked to patients' beliefs about medicines with a potential impact on adherence. These beliefs are reported to be different between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to identify potential determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) including an assessment of the influence of beliefs about medicines and satisfaction with information provided about DMARDs and compare determinants of adherence between RA patients of White British and South Asian. RA patients of either White British (n = 91) or South Asian (n = 89) origin were recruited from secondary care. Data were collected via questionnaires on patients': (1) self-reported adherence (Medication Adherence Report Scale-MARS); (2) beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-BMQ); (3) illness perceptions (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-IPQ) and (4) satisfaction with information about DMARDs (Satisfaction with Information about Medicines questionnaire-SIMS). In addition, clinical and demographic data were collected. The results revealed that socio-demographic factors only explained a small amount of variance in adherence whereas illness representations and treatment beliefs were more substantial in explaining non-adherence to DMARDs. Patients' self-reported adherence was higher in White British than South Asian patients (median 28 (interquartile range 26-30) vs median 26 (interquartile range 23-30) respectively; P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney test). Patients who reported lower adherence were more dissatisfied with the information they had received about their DMARDs (P < 0.001, Spearman correlation, SIMS action and usage subscale; P < 0.001, Spearman correlation, SIMS potential problems subscale) and had more negative beliefs about their DMARDs and were related to ethnicity with South Asian patients having more negative views about medicines. Socio-demographic factors were found to explain a small amount of variance in adherence. Illness representations and treatment beliefs were more important in explaining non-adherence to DMARDs. Clinicians managing South Asian patients with RA need to be aware that low adherence may be linked to negative beliefs about medicines and illness representations of RA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 23%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Other 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 30%
Psychology 11 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2017.
All research outputs
#8,949,979
of 15,261,320 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,560
of 2,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,806
of 367,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#123
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,261,320 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 367,306 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.